Here's Why Dairy Production Is Literally the Saddest Thing Ever

The dairy industry wants you to believe that their farms consist of happy cows grazing in open green pastures. But this couldn’t be further from the truth.

Life for a cow at a dairy farm is grim and filled with sadness and torture. It all starts when mother cows are forcibly impregnated, a highly invasive and stressful procedure. After carrying their babies for nine months—just like humans—they give birth.

This is when the real tragedy begins.

Newborn calves are typically taken from their mothers within just hours of birth. This forced separation from their calves causes the mothers to bellow for days; they even pace and search in vain for their stolen babies.

This heartbreak happens at every dairy farm. In 2013 locals in Newbury, Massachusetts, called the police because of the crying they heard from a nearby dairy farm. Upon investigation, authorities discovered that the cries had come from mourning mothers whose newborns had been ripped away from them. In Ireland, a cow was found stranded on a small island in the middle of a lake months after she swam away from a countryside farm. She was spotted after she’d cleared the island of vegetation. She didn’t swim back to the mainland because she had given birth and didn't want to leave her baby behind.

The bond between mother and calf is very strong. Just imagine the anguish and stress cows endure—giving birth over and over again only to have their babies torn away.

And as if the mother’s grief weren’t terrible enough, what awaits the calf is equally grim. Male calves are isolated and tethered inside small crates until they are killed for veal, and females are raised to produce milk, suffering the same trauma as their mothers. The cycle of abuse for females lasts about five years until they are considered “spent” and sent to slaughter.

See for yourself.


Luckily, consumers can withdraw their financial support from the cruel factory farming industry by adopting a compassionate vegan diet. Click here to get started.